New engine sought for online law system

The Australian company that did a technical evaluation last year of the ill-starred Public Access to Legislation project, InQuirion, has been further commissioned to examine alternative print-rendering software "engines".

The Australian company that did a technical evaluation last year of the ill-starred Public Access to Legislation project, InQuirion, has been further commissioned to examine alternative print-rendering software “engines”.

The engine is one of the parts of the system that has “issues”, the system’s sponsor the Parliamentary Counsel Office has confirmed.

“The technical review concluded that, providing certain issues (including issues relating to the print rendering engine) were satisfactorily addressed, the government could be assured that the PAL system, when implemented, would be operationally stable, maintainable, and capable of supporting future enhancement and development,” says a statement from the PCO.

However, no final decision has been made on the future of the PAL project, and no timeframe for a final decision has been set, the office said last week.

Meanwhile, the PCO has extended its arrangement with Brookers to provide the interim website of New Zealand legislation. This provides “unofficial” versions of New Zealand Acts and Statutory Regulations; the versions planned for the PAL system were to have been the official expression of New Zealand law.

Bills introduced into Parliament since the start of 2003, and bills that have progressed to a further stage in the Parliamentary process since then, are also available on the Knowledge Basket website.

The PAL contract originally had a $5.6 million fixed price, but the cost has escalated to about $8.2 million.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags public access to legislation

More about Counsel

Show Comments
[]