SSC consolidates servers

Many organisations find servers multiplying as new projects are started despite having capacity on existing equipment, but the State Services Commission's e-government unit has been particularly prone to this because of the experimental nature of some of its work.

Many organisations find servers multiplying as new projects are started despite having capacity on existing equipment, but the State Services Commission’s e-government unit has been particularly prone to this because of the experimental nature of some of its work.

Part of the unit’s function is to try out new technologies that may benefit government agencies’ operations, says spokesman Kent Dustin.

“As we added more projects, we were buying more servers, in spite of the fact that the load on some of the existing ones was only around 10%,” he says. By last year, the unit had accumulated 26 servers, some running Linux and some Windows.

After considering proposals involving IBM VMware on Intel processors, IBM I -Series and HP and Sun platforms, the SSC decided on the I-series (formerly System 400) solution, through Logical-CSI, owing to its flexibility, reliability and “other -ilites”, Dustin says. Cost savings are expected.

The e-government unit has a rare kind of workload, with a requirement for stable servers to run the government portal and servers that come and go for transitory projects.

The flexibility of the IBM/Logical arrangement will mean multi-operating system logical servers can be created and torn down according to requirements on the basis of just two physical servers, one in Wellington and one in Auckland. The migration is scheduled to finish in March.

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