Chip-assisted export tracking 'on track'

Improved tracking provisions for export cargo, with resulting longer lead times for documentation are still running smoothly after two weeks of operation, says Garth Wyllie of the Employers and Manufacturers Association (EMA) Northern.

Improved tracking provisions for export cargo, with resulting longer lead times for documentation are still running smoothly after two weeks of operation, says Garth Wyllie of the Employers and Manufacturers Association (EMA) Northern.

When Computerworld last spoke to Wyllie, only a day or two after the start of the scheme on March 1, he suggested the smooth operation to that date might have been a fortunate coincidnece, and there could be troubles further down the line.

There have been “a few who didn’t get sorted out in time” to observe the new requirements, he says, and some who couldn’t get documents to Customs in time for the required 48-hour lead-time and had to take a later flight or ship.

But he cautions “it’s still early days”.

The new requirements, which encompass the optional use of readio frquency identification (RFID) markers, have been sparked chiefly by increased security concerns in the US.

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