Firms curry favour; NAI seeks saviour

Techies whose jobs have been exported to the land of paneer and curry can take solace in reports they're really helping the economy.

It's yet another sad day in Cringeville. The Pulitzer Board has announced winners of the 2004 prizes and, for the 18th consecutive year, I've been passed by. The good news is that I'm still in the running for PC People Magazine's 50 Most Beautiful Geeks. Surely the competition there can't be too tough.

All offshore that's goin' offshore

Techies whose jobs have been exported to the land of paneer and curry can take solace in reports they're really helping the economy. The argument is that moving scut jobs such as support offshore opens up higher-paying positions here. Just last week, India's number two outsource house, Infosys Technologies, announced plans to hire 500 consultants for its new US branch. Their job: to get American firms to outsource even more work (thus boosting the economy even further). In related news, parts of this column will soon be written by a support team based in Bangalore. They'll handle all prepositions, adjectives and semicolons; I'll still be doing the heavy lifting on nouns, verbs and snarky asides.

Scratch and sniffer

Gossip and innuendo continue to deck the halls at Network Associates. The latest scuttlebutt says CEO George Samenuk may soon be headed for greener pastures, although company spokesfolk pooh-pooh the idea. Meanwhile, my spies say NAI has removed the paper covering the windows in the strategy room overlooking Freedom Circle. Perhaps they were just spraying for bugs?

Email addresses with every subscription

A member of the Cringe crew recently received an electronic subscription offer for a software development magazine. Attached to the message was a spreadsheet containing nearly 9000 email addresses, which included well-placed geeks at Fortune 500 firms and government agencies. A few days later a second Cringester reported the same thing, this time with two attached email lists sent out by a different tech publication. My editor and I thought this was a hoot -- until we realised that bad news usually comes in threes. Now we've got our fingers (and legs) crossed, hoping it doesn't happen to us.

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