Cellphone worm, TelstraClear loses deal, MicroSAP?

Top Stories: - Cellphone worm - TelstraClear loses deal - MicroSAP?

Top Stories:

- Cellphone worm

- TelstraClear loses deal

- MicroSAP?

- Cellphone worm

It was hardly a case of shock, horror and cellphones around the world going haywire when the alleged first-ever cellphone worm emerged this week. Russian security firm Kapersky Labs reported that there's a worm out there targeting Nokia series 60 phones running Symbian. The worm inserts itself via Bluetooth connections and can potentially infect series 60 handsets running Symbian 6.1 or later versions. It's not considered a high risk, because the phone user has to switch on Bluetooth and say 'yes' to a pop-up install screen that emerges when the worm seeks to colonise a phone. However, McAfee has noted that "worm activity seriously reduces battery life," and that the worm, dubbed epoc.cabir, will seek to insert itself into other Bluetooth-enabled, Symbian-operated phones within range. While this worm appears to be no big deal, we're likely to see more cellphone worms and viruses in the future and we'll be lucky if they're all as benign as epoc.cabir. SMS-borne denial-of-service attacks are another area of concern, with the potential for smart attackers to render lots of phones useless. Cellphone manufacturers, vendors of cellphone operating systems and users will all have to wise up to the threat.

More details emerge of first cellphone worm - Computerworld Online

- TelstraClear loses deal

Well, well. Three months ago, TelstraClear sent out a gloating media release about how it had won a $30 million deal to supply IP networked voice and data services to the Corrections Department, displacing Telecom. Then last week, Telecom sent out a gloating media release announcing it had displaced TelstraClear and was back in the saddle with this valuable client. Both sides are saying little about the hows and whys of the sudden reversal, but you'd have to guess TelstraClear was simply unable to deliver the service in the timeframe set out in the contract it signed. It doesn't bode well for TelstraClear's aspirations to seriously challenge Telecom, at least not in the lucrative business-corporate space.

Corrections goes TelstraClear, VoIP - Computerworld Online

- MicroSAP?

All sorts of interesting things get uncovered during major court cases, because the parties have to divulge lots of documents and information that wouldn't normally see the light of day. A case in point is the Oracle-US Justice Dept trial, which threw up the extraordinary revelation that Microsoft had considered buying SAP. Apparently Microsoft and SAP actually got together and talked about it before deciding a merger wasn't on the cards, because integrating the two companies would be too hard. There's been a lot of talk of consolidation in the business applications market and yes, Microsoft isn't making as much headway in that space as it'd like, but buying SAP? What would regulatory authorities make of it, given that they're baulking at Oracle's attempted takeover of PeopleSoft? The mind boggles as to what a Microsoft-SAP combo would be like. Would Microsoft workers, long referred to as Microserfs, become Microsaps? Microsoft and SAP are big customers to each other and if it wasn't for the fact they're competing in the small-to-medium sector of the business apps market, you could say their relationship was a bit cosy. So it's a good thing the merger never got beyond the preliminary talks stage, although if the Oracle-PeopleSoft saga is anything to go by, it would have generated copious headlines and stories for the media.

Microsoft, SAP say they considered merging - Computerworld Online

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