Gen-I, Triple Play, Backslapping

The year hasn't started well for solutions and services provider Gen-I. Air NZ flew off with competitor Axon, causing a loss of an estimated $5 million a year. Gen-I has held that particular business for seven years (well, kind of: it inherited Air NZ from Wang).

Top Stories

- Time for Gen-I to hit the bottle?

- Triple Play coming up

- Backslapping time

- Teh M1cr0s0ft pwns j00, h4x0rZ!!!111~~ROFFLES

If you ever wondered what all those funny “words” with lots of numbers and things in them meant, Auntie Microsoft will tell you. Pay special attention to “Leet words of concern or indicating possible illegal activity.”

- A parent's primer to computer slang

- Time for Gen-I to hit the bottle?

The year hasn’t started well for solutions and services provider Gen-I. Air NZ flew off with competitor Axon, causing a loss of an estimated $5 million a year. Gen-I has held that particular business for seven years (well, kind of: it inherited Air NZ from Wang).

Next, we hear that Gen-I is abandoning a major tender for a platform upgrade over at Canterbury District Health. That contract would’ve been worth around $3 million, apparently. It’s not all bad for Gen-I’s master Telecom, however, as stable mate solutions provider Computerland looks likely to scoop up the CDH business.

In August last year, Gen-I lost the MAF IT services contract to Unisys, so it’s not exactly been a winning streak for the solutions provider since Telecom bought it. Some sources suggest that it’s not Gen-I itself, but rather its owner that is the thorn in the side for potential customers.

- Axon gets one back at Gen-i

- Gen-I pulls out of health tender with IBM

- Triple Play coming up

Putting Alcatel in charge of its network appears to have accelerated Telecom’s broadband plans considerably. This time last year, Jetstart was the DSL of choice for most people, not because the speed was sufficient but because it was the only affordable plan.

Now however Telecom’s talking 15Mbit/s downloads (and 1Mbit/s uploads) through the next-generation ADSL2+ which will be rolled out this year – we may even be able to buy the service late next spring.

That’s quite a turnaround for Telecom, which to be honest was dragging its feet with broadband.

Telecom’s able to deploy high-speed DSL as its hooking up roadside cabinets with fibre-optic data cables, and running the DSL over the copper from there. That shortens the distance the DSL signal has to traverse, and thus, allows for greater speeds. I’m not sure where this leaves those who get DSL via their local exchange, but here’s hoping Telecom will upgrade all of us. Yes, we’re looking into the question of how it will affect wholesale UBS as well.

For those who are interested in the details, ADSL2+ doubles the downstream bandwidth from a maximal 1.1MHz to 2.2MHz. This plus other enhancements means higher speeds – around 25Mbit/s if you’re right next to the DSLAM compared to the 8Mbit/s maximum that today’s DSL offers (Telecom’s target speed is only 2Mbit/s however). The 1Mbit/s upstream is puny, but apparently ADSL2+ has an optional mode which will double that too.

Of course, new modems are required for ADSL2+ but they’re already on the market in other countries. In fact, ADSL2 and ADSL2+ are already in use overseas so really NZ is somewhat late as usual.

What will we do with all the bandwidth then? “Triple Play” of course – voice, video and data, all delivered over IP. I’m still dubious about Telecom actually delivering Triple Play, but maybe Alcatel has banged some sense into our incumbent?

- Telecom to offer 15Mbit/s over copper — rollout begins this year

- Backslapping time

Clearly, people are incredibly fascinated by La Vida Geeka. Loads more people read Computerworld and PC World nowadays, according to skyrocketing Nielsen Media Research figures. Well, they read other IDG publications in increasing numbers too even though I don’t write for those. Wonder why that is? Never mind, congrats to everyone for the hard work.

- Computerworld and PC World pile on the readers

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