Moore, Apple, Spit

The northern hemisphere spring Intel Developers' Forum in San Francisco is over, with the chip giant cementing its abandonment of the mega-Hertz is better strategy. Now Intel is banking on doing things simultaneously instead of once-at-a-time-at-blinding-speed to retain the PC performance crown.

Top Stories

- Moore parallelism for Intel

- Apple 1 – Free Speech 0?

- Worse than SPIT

- Thoriated Tungsten!

And here I thought thermionic valves were a thing of the past. Not so … wonder if these 70kg babes could be used for something else than RF duty? Like a truly loud guitar amp?

- EIMAC 4CM500,000G

http://www.cpii.com/eimac/catalog/249046.htm

- Moore parallelism for Intel

The northern hemisphere spring Intel Developers’ Forum in San Francisco is over, with the chip giant cementing its abandonment of the mega-Hertz is better strategy. Now Intel is banking on doing things simultaneously instead of once-at-a-time-at-blinding-speed to retain the PC performance crown.

Will it work? Intel has always been a parallelism pioneer but getting the concept out to the masses hasn’t been a total success. The HyperThreading feature in the current generation of Pentium 4 processors doesn’t make a whole heap of difference for overall system performance because applications have to be carefully coded — threaded and avoiding resource contention, in geek-speak — to show tangible benefit.

Chipmaker underdog AMD meanwhile isn’t standing still, but getting in on the parallelism game as well, with dual-core Opterons coming out in the middle of this year. AMD claims the Opteron/Athlon64 architecture was designed from the beginning to fit a second core, in fact.

- Intel bolsters Moore's Law with multi cores

http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/UNID/CEDA19FD4C61A8C4CC256FC40023F818

- Press release: AMD to release first x86 multi-core processors mid-2005

http://www.amd.com/us-en/0,,3715_11787,00.html?redir=CPPA64

- Apple 1 — Free Speech 0?

Apple Computer has kindly served us dirty rotten journos with a reminder that our privilege of protecting our sources is not absolute. It’s pretty non-existent, actually, and really only relies on some stubborn sods being willing to go to prison rather than revealing the identity of whistleblowers.

Agreeing with Apple’s legal counsel that trade secrets may have been breached, California superior court judge James Kleinberg ordered that it can go ahead with its subpoena against Mac fan sites ThinkSecret, PowerPage and AppleInsider.

Losing that legal skirmish means the sites may eventually be forced to give up the names of their informers, who will then have to put their heads on the block together with the web-journos who published the leaked information. It’s not at that stage yet — common sense may still prevail and Apple’s legal sharks could be defeated — but signs are not good.

You’d think a company with 4% marketshare would be wiser than to bite the hands that feed it, but no.

- IHT: Apple lawsuit strikes at core of web reporting

http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/03/16/business/apple.html

Go go go, Hiawatha!

- Electronic Frontier Foundation: court crushes online journalists' rights

http://eff.org/

- ThinkSecret

www.thinksecret.com

- AppleInsider

- www.appleinsider.com

- Worse than SPIT

IP telephony is indeed the next big thing. It’s cheap and easy, and will reach billions of people soon because even old-school telcos are going all-IP now.

The ubiquity of IP telephony, however, threatens to become a major problem. The prospect of lots and lots and lots of VoIP users in India and China manually spamming is a nightmare scenario (although I wonder in what language?)

Cheap internet access, cheap PCs and cheap operating systems: could this be the IP telephony Armageddon in making? Well, Fred Cohen has something of a reputation in the computer security business, and he’s not wrong when he points to marketers being completely and utterly ruthless about getting their sales message across. He also makes an interesting point about the “Common Carrier” laws in the US, which state that providers are not responsible for the content of calls, unless they start blocking calls … based on their content.

Hmm. That old-fashioned expensive landline is starting to look good again, I’m afraid.

- VoIP to fuel plague of 'dialling for dollars'

http://www.internetnews.com/xSP/article.php/3489591

- Fred Cohen and Associates

http://all.net/

That’s a hideous site, Fred.

- Robert Slade on Fred Cohen

http://www.cknow.com/vtutor/vtsladecohen.htm

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