Armed with cam phones; Great leap backwards

As have been reported before, people in the midst of the horror are using digital cameras in their phones to snap pictures of what's going on. Some say it's citizens' journalism, others think it ghoulish voyeurism.

Top Stories

- A populace armed with cam phones

- The great leap backwards

In an office far removed from productivity

"The IPv6 version has extra scenes and extra colour support."

Masterpiece! Shame I hate Star Bores though. He should do War and Peace.

- Star ASCIImation Wars

(This link will open a telnet window. To quit, press Ctrl-] and q.)

- Simon Jansen's original ASCIImation site

"Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time."

A populace armed with cam phones

Luckily nobody was killed in the latest round of terror bombs in London, and only person was injured. As have been reported before, people in the midst of the horror are using digital cameras in their phones to snap pictures of what's going on. Some say it's citizens' journalism, others think it ghoulish voyeurism.

That cam-phones should be used to gather evidence against the terrorists is an interesting twist though. The British police are canvassing images from readers, which is quite odd really because that country is carpeted in CCTV cameras, with just about everyone's likeness being recorded a few times a day.

I'm not sure what to think of this. On the one hand, if it leads to the bombers getting caught, great, but it does also reinforce what Scott McNealy of Sun Microsystems said: "You have zero privacy anyway - get over it".

- Police request images after second wave of UK blasts

- BBC reader pictures of the London bombings

The great leap backwards

When I got Telecom ADSL for the first time in 1999, it ran at the then amazing speed of around 6Mbit/s towards me, and 750kbit/s towards the rest of the world. The usage bills were pretty amazing too, but Telecom promised they would get lower eventually.

This they did after much too long, but the price for that was a much lower standard of service. It's now 2005, and the best Telecom can offer is 2Mbit/s down and 128kbit/s up. This is an improvement on the 256kbit/s download speed service that was the first to feature billing that wasn't a financial suicide, but with the choked-off upstream pipe and low 10GB monthly data limit, it's still pretty poor compared to just about everywhere else.

Will the situation improve? Telecom isn't keen: it says that there is no demand for the higher speed plans, so it's now hiding them and worse, killing off the JetStream Partnering Programme that ISPs were able to sell full-rate DSL under. Since most ISPs aren't willing to resell DSL under the low-margin but high-risk Telecom Wholesale Services Agreement that apparently (we are not entirely sure) would have the full-rate DSL, their customers face life in the slow, 2Mbps/128kbps max UBS lane.

Overseas however customers are enjoying faster speeds and lower prices. Isn't it funny how the demand is there and not here?

The low-grade DSL is turning into a commercial millstone around third-party ISPs' necks as well but that's not a surprise. We said it would right from the launch of UBS. The only surprising thing is that so many ISPs decided ignore this obvious fact and go with UBS.

- Be 24 meg service to cost under £30 a month

- Readers: give us faster upstream

- ISPs formally complain to Commerce Commission

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

More about BBC Worldwide AustralasiaScott CorporationSun Microsystems

Show Comments

Market Place

[]