Gattung gone by December?

There's a persistent rumour in Wellington that Big T will join the unspecified number of Telecom departees next month, and pursue opportunities elsewhere. It's impossible to say how correct this is, but looking at it in a different way, could Gattung continue as CEO of Telecom in the wake of the upcoming changes?

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Going round the bored bend

- Gattung gone by December?

- Death march is over

A copyright lawyer’s wet dream

YouTube is great but… the search function kind of sucks there. Which is good and bad I suppose, depending on what the purpose of your search is.

Given how aggressive copyright lawyers are getting with YouTube and how fast the good clips get taken down, I’m not sure if I should share the secret of Indextube with you, but… here goes. Just don’t show it to the Litigious Lot, mmkay?

- Jagshemash! Bags o’ Borat clips!

- Those world famous Gypsy Punks Gogol Bordello:

Broadband unleashed too far

More and more customers aggregated … pushing data … congestion reached critical levels and …

- AT&T Investigates DSLAM Explosion

(With thanks to AJ)

Gattung gone by December?

There’s a persistent rumour in Wellington that Big T will join the unspecified number of Telecom departees next month, and pursue opportunities elsewhere. It’s impossible to say how correct this is, but looking at it in a different way, could Gattung continue as CEO of Telecom in the wake of the upcoming changes?

She is, and will forever be, associated with L’Ancienne Régime at Telecom, the old timers who butted heads with the government over broadband and lost. I hear that Gattung’s speech last week served only to further anger officials already appalled by what they see as an arrogant, recalcitrant Telecom.

Furthermore, if as is reported the government is minded to split Telecom into three parts — retail, wholesale and network — all with separate, independent management, it’s hard to see where Gattung would fit in under such a scenario.

The AAPT fiasco in Australia also weighs heavily against Gattung. Not only did the Australian venture incur huge losses for Telecom, but it also showed up a lack of ability to function in a competitive environment.

If Gattung goes, I’d be surprised if anyone replaces her unless it’s as a caretaker overseeing the move into the new regulatory environment. For that role, it seems to make more sense to promote someone within Telecom who knows the situation and can work with it straight away. A finance person like Marko Bogoievski would be right, and he has been wheeled out into the public a great deal more lately than in the past.

FryUp is hoping that instead of demoralising Telecom, a split will energise it, as it appears to have done with BT in the UK. Either way, Telecom needs to take its broadband task more seriously than it currently does by supplying an “unlimited” DSL plan that:

* Is limited to 700MB traffic between 4pm and 12 midnight

* Rate-limits peer-to-peer traffic at all times — this includes Skype

* Rate-limits Usenet newsgroups, text as well as binary ones

* Is limited to 128kbit/s on the uplink

* Has hourly usage monitoring during peak hours

* Puts customers into a go-slow sin-bin for a week if they use too much peak hour data

Xtra is marketing the above Go Large plan as having “unlimited internet usage”, which doesn’t seem quite right given its constraints. Oh well, at least it didn’t turn out to have a 200MB limit per hour as Telecom first said.

- 'Sword' may cut Telecom into thirds

- No overage charges on Go Large broadband plan: Xtra

Death march is over

It took six long years to beat Windows Vista into Release To Manufacturing (RTM) shape, but the DVD presses are a-glowing now, burning disc images of Microsoft’s new operating system. Microsofties around the world must be relieved that the RTM date was made — and exhausted too, I reckon. I expected a wild party like the ones the Microsoft Exchange division used to have, or at least some drinks with the local ‘softies, but nothing at all apart from an emailed press release.

Unusually, the release wasn’t accompanied by a security outfit somewhere announcing that they’ve found the first hole or bug in Vista, but it’s a safe bet researchers are busy pulling it apart looking for flaws.

Could this be the last full operating system release from Redmond though? While Microsoft has said “never again” to long development cycles like the one that Vista suffered from, it’s not getting easier to develop a secure, feature-rich operating system — quite the opposite in fact.

While you hack away on code, the opposition (read: Google) doesn’t have to commit to huge capital and personnel expenditure, and deferring revenues until the product ships. Instead, Google will just make more money and in a nightmare scenario for Microsoft, release a simple operating system that boots into a web browser.

If a GoogleOS happens, it’s likely to be free as in paid for by advertising and most probably built on Open Source code. Going out on a limb, I suspect Google would prefer using one of the free *BSD code bases rather than risking running into GPL issues with Linux, but that might not matter.

I wouldn’t be surprised if Microsoft releases something similar to the above soon, just to pre-empt Google.

- Windows Vista on its way to manufacturing

- Windows Vista Team Blog

- Google set to overtake C4's UK ad revenue

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