IBM says it's time to rethink IT

IBM unveils tools designed to cut IT costs and harness mobile opportunities at its annual Impact conference in Las Vegas this month

In an IBM survey of more than 700 CIOs, three quarters said they were developing mobile strategies mainly to achieve an improvement in employee productivity. CIOs responding to the survey mentioned decreasing dependence on email, improving social collaboration and adopting cloud technologies to reach mobile workers as specific objectives.

Wieck said that the Mobile Foundation platform — designed to encompass mobile application development, integration, security and management — draws on lessons learned from earlier “e-business” experience.

“We learned that it’s not just about creating a website, it’s how you integrate that with the rest of your systems and later on, how you manage the content. No solution is an island.”

Local contingent

IBM hosted a small New Zealand contingent at the event, including representatives from local customers BNZ and Air New Zealand, several business partners as well as a handful of Wellington-based IBM engineers and technical specialists.

At one of the conference’s technology sessions, Air New Zealand team leader Richard Gill delivered a presentation on the airline’s recent upgrade of IBM hardware and its use of Websphere technology.

Speaking to an audience of around 40, Gill revealed in considerable detail how Air New Zealand’s in-memory systems architecture was allowing the airline to monitor and report its seat availability in real time.

This real time capability had been harnessed to provide a feature on the Air New Zealand website called ‘How far can I go?’ which displays the various routes that are available to customers for a given price.

The in-memory architecture was also instrumental in administering the airline’s Grabaseat flight auction system and in streamlining interactions with travel agents and other partners, Gill said.

At a time when more and more booking requests were coming from fare comparison sites such as Expedia and Webjet, Gill said any delay in response — even those which were measured in milli-

seconds — could be critical in determining whether the airline made a sale or not.

• Foreman attended the IBM Impact 2012 conference in Las Vegas as a guest of IBM New Zealand

IBM held a CIO breakfast on Tuesday in Auckland attended by 70 CIOs and IT Managers. See the CIO article The New Disruptors here.

In an IBM survey of more than 700 CIOs, three quarters said they were developing mobile strategies mainly to achieve an improvement in employee productivity. CIOs responding to the survey mentioned decreasing dependence on email, improving social collaboration and adopting cloud technologies to reach mobile workers as specific objectives.

Wieck said that the Mobile Foundation platform — designed to encompass mobile application development, integration, security and management — draws on lessons learned from earlier “e-business” experience.

“We learned that it’s not just about creating a website, it’s how you integrate that with the rest of your systems and later on, how you manage the content. No solution is an island.”

Local contingent

IBM hosted a small New Zealand contingent at the event, including representatives from local customers BNZ and Air New Zealand, several business partners as well as a handful of Wellington-based IBM engineers and technical specialists.

At one of the conference’s technology sessions, Air New Zealand team leader Richard Gill delivered a presentation on the airline’s recent upgrade of IBM hardware and its use of Websphere technology.

Speaking to an audience of around 40, Gill revealed in considerable detail how Air New Zealand’s in-memory systems architecture was allowing the airline to monitor and report its seat availability in real time.

This real time capability had been harnessed to provide a feature on the Air New Zealand website called ‘How far can I go?’ which displays the various routes that are available to customers for a given price.

The in-memory architecture was also instrumental in administering the airline’s Grabaseat flight auction system and in streamlining interactions with travel agents and other partners, Gill said.

At a time when more and more booking requests were coming from fare comparison sites such as Expedia and Webjet, Gill said any delay in response — even those which were measured in milli-

seconds — could be critical in determining whether the airline made a sale or not.

• Foreman attended the IBM Impact 2012 conference in Las Vegas as a guest of IBM New Zealand

IBM held a CIO breakfast on Tuesday in Auckland attended by 70 CIOs and IT Managers. See the CIO article The New Disruptors here.

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