Google Apps backup enhanced

Datacentre network offers heightened service

Google recently extended what it describes as highly advanced and sophisticated data backup and recovery, to all components of the company's Apps communication and collaboration suite.

At the core is real-time, synchronous replication in multiple servers and datacentres of every morsel of data entered into or modified in any of the Apps components, like Gmail, the Docs office suite, Sites and Calendar.

"Any time you change any data in Apps, whether writing a sentence in a document or changing a cell in a spreadsheet, in the background we go and write that data to multiple servers within one datacentre and also in other datacentres," says Rajen Sheth, Google Apps senior product manager.

Over several years, Google has been adding Apps components to this "best in class" disaster-recovery umbrella, to the point where the entire suite is now covered. Also included are stand-alone Apps components versions, such as regular Gmail, Docs and Sites accounts.

Google doesn't charge for this disaster-recovery protection, whose goal in the event of a system failure in a Google server or facility is to lose no data and provide "instant" failover for minimal or no downtime, above what is possible with even a very expensive storage area network, Sheth says.

Some large companies have invested in synchronous replication of the sort Google is able to do, but at a cost that is prohibitive to most enterprises and smaller businesses. Google is able to provide this disaster recovery protection for free because it operates many datacentres around the world that are connected via high-speed links, Sheth says.

Google has posted a blog detailing the technology.

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Tags rajan shethmanagementGoogleGoogle Apps

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