Multitasking tops features in iPhone 4.0

Enterprise features, folders, mail, iBooks and game centre network feature in OS upgrade

Location services are the third background API. You can continue to get directions from turn-by-turn GPS apps, even while performing other tasks such as listening to music in the iPod app.

The fourth background API is also location-based. Some applications use location information, such as Loopt, but they don't require GPS to be always-on, so instead Apple uses cell phone location information. When a user switches cell phone towers, it can indicate to the service that location has changed.

Apple realizes that privacy is important when it comes to location information, so it's adding an indicator in the menu bar, next to the battery icon, to let you know if an application has requested your location any time in the past 24 hours. And preferences will allow you to disable or enable location for each app.

The fifth background API is push notifications, to which Apple has added a new service called Local Notifications. This lets apps launch notifications without the need for an external server: so, as Forstall suggested, you can have a TV guide app that alerts you when a show is beginning.

Task completion is the sixth background API, and it's designed for apps that can take a while to finish certain tasks: for example, uploading photographs to Flickr. Now you can switch to other apps and let Flickr finish its business.

Then there's the seventh and final background API, Fast App Switching, which allows an app to dump all information related to its current state and then go into a sleep-like mode where it consumes no processor power. But, when you switch back to the app, everything returns to exactly the point where you left it.

Folders

Finally, an answer to the problem of having too many apps. Steve Jobs showed off a Folders feature for the iPhone's Home screen, allowing users to group applications. When you're editing your Home screen, you can drag one app on top of another app to automatically created a folder. The iPhone automatically names folders based on the categories of the apps.

So, for example, you can create a Games folder merely by dropping one game on top of another. The folder icon displays a small set of tiles showing you which apps are inside, and you can drag the folder anywhere on the Home screen, just like an app icon. There's no limit to the number of the folders you can have, and it's even possible to put one in the iPhone's Dock. The addition of folders means the iPhone now lets you easily see up more than 2000 apps.

In a move borrowed from the iPad, iPhone 4.0 also lets you change the background wallpaper on your iPhone's Home screen--this can either be the same as the lock screen's wallpaper or an entirely different image.

Mail

Apple severely revamped the Mail application in iPhone 4.0, adding support for new features such as a unified inbox, that allows you to see all incoming mail from multiple accounts; you can also quickly jump between inboxes for multiple accounts. In addition, Mail also now supports more than one Exchange account at a time, and you can also organize by thread.

Attachments are enhanced as well: you can now tap files attached to e-mail messages to open them in a separate application, including third-party apps.Location services are the third background API. You can continue to get directions from turn-by-turn GPS apps, even while performing other tasks such as listening to music in the iPod app.

The fourth background API is also location-based. Some applications use location information, such as Loopt, but they don't require GPS to be always-on, so instead Apple uses cell phone location information. When a user switches cell phone towers, it can indicate to the service that location has changed.

Apple realizes that privacy is important when it comes to location information, so it's adding an indicator in the menu bar, next to the battery icon, to let you know if an application has requested your location any time in the past 24 hours. And preferences will allow you to disable or enable location for each app.

The fifth background API is push notifications, to which Apple has added a new service called Local Notifications. This lets apps launch notifications without the need for an external server: so, as Forstall suggested, you can have a TV guide app that alerts you when a show is beginning.

Task completion is the sixth background API, and it's designed for apps that can take a while to finish certain tasks: for example, uploading photographs to Flickr. Now you can switch to other apps and let Flickr finish its business.

Then there's the seventh and final background API, Fast App Switching, which allows an app to dump all information related to its current state and then go into a sleep-like mode where it consumes no processor power. But, when you switch back to the app, everything returns to exactly the point where you left it.

Folders

Finally, an answer to the problem of having too many apps. Steve Jobs showed off a Folders feature for the iPhone's Home screen, allowing users to group applications. When you're editing your Home screen, you can drag one app on top of another app to automatically created a folder. The iPhone automatically names folders based on the categories of the apps.

So, for example, you can create a Games folder merely by dropping one game on top of another. The folder icon displays a small set of tiles showing you which apps are inside, and you can drag the folder anywhere on the Home screen, just like an app icon. There's no limit to the number of the folders you can have, and it's even possible to put one in the iPhone's Dock. The addition of folders means the iPhone now lets you easily see up more than 2000 apps.

In a move borrowed from the iPad, iPhone 4.0 also lets you change the background wallpaper on your iPhone's Home screen--this can either be the same as the lock screen's wallpaper or an entirely different image.

Mail

Apple severely revamped the Mail application in iPhone 4.0, adding support for new features such as a unified inbox, that allows you to see all incoming mail from multiple accounts; you can also quickly jump between inboxes for multiple accounts. In addition, Mail also now supports more than one Exchange account at a time, and you can also organize by thread.

Attachments are enhanced as well: you can now tap files attached to e-mail messages to open them in a separate application, including third-party apps.iBooks on iPhone

In another borrowed feature from the iPad, Apple will be making iBooks available to the iPhone in iPhone OS 4.0. It's a smaller version of the iPad app, but allows the same features, including purchasing from the iBookstore. And you'll be able to sync your place and bookmarks between multiple devices: leave off reading a book on your iPad, and you can start reading it in the same place on your iPhone.

Enterprise features

iPhone 4.0 has added new features for business users. At the top of the list is better data protection: all e-mail, including attachments, can be encrypted with your PIN code. And Apple will make encryption APIs available to third-party developers, allowing them to do the same with data stored in those apps.

Apple's also rolling out improvements for mobile device management, for those companies that deploy large numbers of iPhones. Companies can now wirelessly distribute applications anywhere in the world from their own servers. In addition, there's the aforementioned support for multiple Exchange accounts, and support for Exchange Server 2010. Plus, Apple is supporting SSL VPN for both Juniper and Cisco.

Game Center

Billed as a "developer preview" in iPhone OS 4, Apple announced a social-gaming network called Game Center, which seems poised to compete with services such as Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network. You'll be able to invite friends, participate in online matchmaking, compete in leaderboards, earn achievements, and more. While available first to developers--presumably so they can integrate the functionality in their apps--Game Center will roll out to end users later this year.

iAd

As was widely rumored, Apple announced its own built-in advertising system for the iPhone OS, iAd. Developers to incorporate ads into their application and use both video and interactive elements without taking users out of the current application. And the system is built entirely on HTML5.

"It's all about helping our developers make money through advertising so they can keep their free apps free," said Jobs.

Availability and compatibility

While Apple is releasing a developer preview of iPhone 4.0 on Thursday, it won't be available to end users until this summer. And not all devices will be able to reap all the benefits. Owners of the iPhone 3GS and third-generation iPod touch should be able to run all the features, but iPhone 3G and second-generation iPod touch owners will only support some of the features--for instance, those devices will not be able to use the multitasking features.

As for Apple's newest device, the iPad, Jobs said that iPhone 4.0 will arrive on the tablet device sometime this fall.

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