The Upload: Your tech news briefing for Monday, February 9

In-car wireless adds up to hacking, privacy problems ... ARM buys IoT security firm ... Alibaba funds phone maker ... and more news

Mercedes-Benz's F015 concept is a self-driving, hydrogen-powered living room

Mercedes-Benz's F015 concept is a self-driving, hydrogen-powered living room

Big Auto is watching you behind the wheel of that hackable car

A new study of the mobile data and wireless electronic systems proliferating in cars says they present serious security problems as well as potential threats to individual privacy. The report coming Monday from Senator Ed Markey's office is based on information from 16 car makers, the New York Times says, and looks at not only how wireless systems leave vehicle electronics vulnerable to hacking, but also at the wholesale collection of data on driving history.

ARM puts IoT security center stage with Offspark acquisition

The microprocessor design company that plays a dominant role in the mobile space has bought what it calls the leading security company in the Internet of Things arena. ARM Holdings said Monday it's buying Dutch company Offspark, developer of the PolarSSL embedded Transport Layer Security technology.

Alibaba funds Chinese phonemaker to support its own mobile OS

Alibaba is investing US$590 million in a small phone maker in China that's put its hardware behind Alibaba's YunOS operating system. Meizu is a little-known handset vendor but it has a phone that runs Alibaba's mobile OS -- an Android competitor which the e-commerce giant sees as a platform for popularizing its own Internet services.

Pols want Verizon's supercookies probed

Three U.S. senators want an investigation into whether Verizon Wireless' use of so-called supercookies to track the online activities of its subscribers amount to privacy violations. They're also considering new legislation targeting such tactics. Verizon has said it will let consumers opt out, but privacy advocates favor requiring an opt-in.

Corning has a followup to Gorilla Glass

The developer of the super-tough Gorilla Glass that's made it less traumatic to accidentally drop your mobile device has an even hardier substance waiting in the wings. Corning Glass told an investor conference that it has a product that's as drop-resistant as Gorilla Glass, with a scratch-resistance that "approaches" synthetic sapphire, Cnet reported.

Medical fraud worries on the rise with Anthem hack

The breach of U.S. health insurer Anthem that was revealed last week may reflect a trend for hackers to go where the richest information is -- and with the move to electronic health records, the spotlight may be on medical targets. Not only do the records frequently have a broad and deep set of personal and credit information, but they also provide the data to enable medical identity theft. Meanwhile, healthcare as an industry is under-invested in cybersecurity relative to other businesses like banks.

Mobile wallets have a trust problem

If mobile wallets and payment apps have been slow to take off, it may be because consumers' trust in them is eroding, not growing, according to a recent survey of 15,000 mobile users in 15 countries. Not only do many mobile users believe the systems aren't secure, they are also concerned about having to share too much personal information when enabling an app.

Watch now

DARPA is planning fast, cheap satellite launches: it wants to send orbiters weighing 100 pounds or less into low earth orbit within 24 hours for less than $1 million per launch.

One last thing

Google Fiber didn't fix the profound digital divide in Kansas City -- but it put a spotlight on it. Fast Company looks at the lessons learned.

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Tags Verizon Wireless'Arm HoldingsGooglesecurityComponentsalibabaCorningmobileAnthem

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