GPS technology enhances golf players’ game at Queenstown resort

Millbrook Resort says it is first in the country to deploy cloud-based Golf Pilot system

Millbrook Resort in Queenstown has deployed a cloud-based GPS system for its new fleet of golf carts.

The cloud-based Golf Pilot system, created by GPS Systems International, uses Samsung TAB devices and employs technology to enhance players’ golf game while also providing some safety features for management.

Brian Spicer, head of golf at Millbrook Resort, says the resort is the first club in the country to use the technology. Each of the resort’s 50 Yamaha carts is now fitted with a white Samsung Golf Pilot unit mounted to the front windscreen and links to the main computer dashboard in the resort’s Pro Shop.

Once players set-off for their round, the interactive Golf Pilot system starts tracking the cart’s location through the resort. It enables players to see where they are on the course, highlights course no-go areas, shows pro-tips on how best to play the hole and players can measure the distance to any point of interest including bunkers and the pin on the green.

At the pro shop, the interactive and real-time map shows management where each of the carts are at any given time, meaning they can move slow players on and even call players back if they’re unlikely to finish before dark.

To ensure players stay on track while on course, a warning sounds whenever a cart approaches an area where it is not allowed to go such as greens or a nature area. Course overview maps highlight course play areas to prevent players losing their way.

Future enhancements will allow players to upload pictures and score cards direct to social media. The system’s built-in scorecard will be available to print over wireless WiFi.

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The ability to know the location of every cart in the fleet is crucial and extremely important on a 500 acre resort. We can clearly see how far the last player is from finishing and if someone has taken a cart back to their room and forgotten to return it.

Allan McKay, Millbrook Resort

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“From a manager’s point of view, the ability to know the location of every cart in the fleet is crucial and extremely important on a 500-acre resort,” says Millbrook Resort head golf professional Allan McKay. “We can clearly see how far the last player is from finishing and if someone has taken a cart back to their room and forgotten to return it.”

Golf Pilot can operate in up to sixty different languages including Japanese, Mandarin, Cantonese, German, Dutch, Spanish and French. “We’ve already had great feedback from international players who love the fact they can play a round and have guidance in their own language,” says McKay.

McKay says his favourite Golf Pilot feature as a player is the interactive “cross hair” target.

“This is so accurate. It’s interactive so you can drag it to your golf ball and see what the layup distance is to any target you choose and what the distance is from there to the green. It’s gold.”

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Send news tips and comments to divina_paredes@idg.co.nz

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