Oracle now charging US$90 for ODF-Office plug-in

The tool was available at no charge under Sun
Oracle now charging US$90 for ODF-Office plug-in

Oracle has imposed a fee of US$90 per user on a plug-in for Microsoft Office that was available at no cost under Sun Microsystems' ownership.

The tool allows Word, Excel and PowerPoint users to read, edit and save documents in the ODF (Open Document Format), which is used by the competing OpenOffice productivity suite.

Sun, which was acquired by Oracle earlier this year, founded the open-source project that created OpenOffice.

Oracle continues to sponsor the project and sells two editions of OpenOffice in product form. A standard edition, meant for single users or very small companies, costs $49.95 per perpetual license. The enterprise edition, which requires a minimum of 100 users, adds features such as a Microsoft SharePoint connector and SDK (software development kit), and costs $90 per perpetual license.

A minimum of 100 users is also required to order the Office ODF plug-in, according to Oracle's Web site. In addition, customers who wish to receive upgrades in the future must also purchase a support contract, which costs roughly 22 percent of license fees per year.

The ODF plug-in is meant in part to provide interoperability between Microsoft's platform and ODF, which is backed by an lobbying group that counts IBM, EMC and Oracle among its members.

While Microsoft added support for ODF with the release of Office 2007 Service Pack 2 last year, Oracle's move could also be meant to snare business from enterprises that are reluctant to upgrade from Office 2003 but desire ODF compatibility, as some users noted on an Ubuntu forum.

An Oracle spokeswoman didn't immediately respond to a request for comment Tuesday.

More about: EMC, Excel, IBM, IBM Australia, Microsoft, OpenOffice, Oracle, Sun Microsystems, Ubuntu
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Comments

Anonymous

1

<em>"Oracle continues to sponsor the project and sells two editions of OpenOffice in product form. A standard edition, meant for single users or very small companies, costs $49.95 per perpetual license. The enterprise edition, which requires a minimum of 100 users, adds features such as a Microsoft SharePoint connector and SDK (software development kit), and costs $90 per perpetual license."</em>

I think that writer of the article has Open Office confused with Star Office. Open Office is free to download from the openoffice.org web site.

Anonymous

2

This is what is commonly known as a Footgun moment.
In one grab for money, Oracle has just alienated a lot of Open Source supporters who will now view everything Oracle does with a high degree of suspicion.

Ja-Ja

3

And will the people who manage Oracle reimburse everyone who made Open Office possible. Let me see - should I start exercising my IP rights and renumeration for Oracles use of my property?

Or should I just declare them to be another candidate for the Corporate Moron of the Year award?

Al

4

I still wonder why a company like Oracle purchased Sun. Yes, they probably felt a need to go after the hardware support contracts. However, they aren't going to give Java the attention it deserves short of make it do more of what they need (I'm sure Gosling would have more to add). They sure aren't going to do anything with OpenSolaris. They sure don't need another IDE. Despite what was told to the EU (and how quickly they were satisfied) mysql's future is questionable at least at Oracle. Charging for an ODF plug-in just isn't right. Oracle and Ellison don't seem to be the right kind of corporate match for Sun.

MBB

5

US$90 per user on [b]*a*[/b[ plug-in for Microsoft

It is just their version of the plugin. But because ODF is [i]open[/i] anyone is allowed to write compatible plugins - and people do.
See: http://sourceforge.net/projects/odf-converter/
Or companies can come together and collectively hire a software programmer to write one for them

Anonymous

6

If companies pay M$ with a smile and thanks, they can also pay other parties like Oracle. M$ does not provide the tool they need, Oracle does, so let them pay !

Anonymous

7

Oracle has taken most the major sun clients off resellers and is selling direct, thus causing a range of resellers to drop the business all together. Has Oracle won any friends... wait and see.... maybe they do, maybe they wont

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